Thoughts on Stock Photography after a month or so

My stock photography on Dreamstime and Shutterstock has taught me a LOT about how this business works. Stock photography, for those who don’t know, are photos you’d see in a magazine or an article that are expressedly used to sell a product. A picture of a delicious strawberry about to hit juicy red lips is a stock photo, posed and created with perfect lighting and technique to be sold. I’ve learned a ton through being rejected — and Shutterstock initially drew me away from wanting to continue. Why? Because while Dreamstime was soaking up my images, Shutterstock was rejecting, rejecting, rejecting for subtle things. The vast majority of my art is taken in the field, not in studio. My in studio work has a MUCH higher submission rate — but its also boring stuff. Apples n’ shit. Okay, my last bunch was a handful of foreign bills, and my passport being handed off to an invisible border guard.

Both sold. Repeatedly.

Hum…I have maybe 3x the work on Dreamstime. I’ve sold one photo. One. On shutterstock, I have far fewer prints but those that are in are of the quality they demand — and I’ve made 13 sales in the same amount of time. There’s a lesson there about constructive criticism.

Waiting for my old computer to finish some updates before I send it off to its new owner. Now that I have the Macbook I needed to score some $NT. I think it knows me plans, as it’s taking the hour BEFORE I’m supposed to meet the new owner to install 20 Windows updates without my permission. This is why I’m a Mac owner now, foolish Toshiba…

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